Still Standing: Evaluating Visitors’ Interest in Slave Dwellings

This is a piece my classmates and I wrote as a guest post for North Carolina Connecting to Collections. It is based on a poster we presented at the North Carolina Museums Council conference last week in Durham. We are grateful to NC Connecting to Collections for the interest in the project and for the opportunity to share it with their online community via their blog, Collections Conversations.

collectionsconversations

Thanks to Beth Bullock, Jayd Buteaux, Caitlin Butler, and Bonnie Soper for this guest post. The students first presented this information during a poster session at NCMC‘s annual meeting last week and we’re grateful to be able to share it with NC C2C’s online community.

In the fall of 2014, graduate students at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington started a yearlong project focusing on the preservation and interpretation of slave dwellings. The first part in the process was to gather information on the community’s general impressions about slavery and slave dwellings.

Slave Quarter at the Bellamy Mansion Slave Quarter at the Bellamy Mansion

We conducted 90 visitor surveys at the Bellamy Mansion and 12 focus groups with various individuals across age groups and races within the local Wilmington community. This was done in conjunction with research on various slave dwellings, the history of slavery, and slave dwelling preservation. The data we compiled…

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