History in Song: The 1992 Los Angeles Riots

On this day in 1992 the Los Angeles riots broke out in response to two specific incidents in the city and general mounting racial tensions. Just over a year prior an African American man, Rodney King, was beaten and tasered by police during a traffic stop/chase resulting in the officers involved being charged with excessiveContinue reading “History in Song: The 1992 Los Angeles Riots”

‘Unconventional’ Mothers: Latina Immigrants in the Early & Late 20th Century U.S.

During women’s history month, I highlighted not only trailblazing, pioneering, “noteworthy” or famous women, but also controversial, lesser-known, and everyday women. All women have been a part of history and, like men, deserve to be remembered, documented, studied, and presented in all of their complicated, multifaceted glory. Today’s post explores the ultimate woman in manyContinue reading “‘Unconventional’ Mothers: Latina Immigrants in the Early & Late 20th Century U.S.”

Reflections on Women’s History Month

March was Women’s History Month and I was reminded of how much I love women’s history. From seeing others posting about the women of the past who inspired them, honoring trailblazers, pioneers, and rebels, to doing my own posts, researching, writing about, and revisiting past work I’ve done on women in history, I am feelingContinue reading “Reflections on Women’s History Month”

Women & Family Ties in Immigration: Anna, Julian, & Paranka Debaylo

For Women’s History Month I am revisiting some of my favorite research projects I’ve undertaken and focusing on women of all walks of life, not just “great” or notable women –though I love that many are highlighting the wonderful, trailblazing, inspiring women of the past this month.  Introduction Today’s post is about Anna, Julian andContinue reading “Women & Family Ties in Immigration: Anna, Julian, & Paranka Debaylo”

Día de Muertos: Nuestra Celebración

Día de Muertos or Day of the Dead is actually a 3 day celebration in honor and in memory of the deceased. Despite the association with death and skulls, the tradition is all about remembering deceased relatives and honoring their memory. It is a colorful and bright celebration of their lives. The modern holiday combinesContinue reading “Día de Muertos: Nuestra Celebración”

Public Historian on Vacation: The Missions of San Antonio

This is part four of my Public Historian on Vacation series, which was originally intended to be a three part series. However, I realized I had more to say about various stops along the way. However, this will be the third and final post about our time in San Antonio before moving on to ourContinue reading “Public Historian on Vacation: The Missions of San Antonio”

Public Historian on Vacation: San Antonio & The Alamo

After leaving Galveston, we drove to San Antonio to meet up with my other set of grandparents (my mother’s mother and husband). We arrived, ate barbecue on the River Walk (because when in Texas…) and then set off to see the Alamo (because again, when in Texas.) My mother, having grown up in Texas, hadContinue reading “Public Historian on Vacation: San Antonio & The Alamo”

Interpretive Plans, Home Tours, Newsletters, and Social Justice

The semester is flying by! The Volga to Cape Fear project has moved along smoothly and we now have an official title for the exhibit. Push and Pull: Eastern European and Russian Migration to the Cape Fear Region will open April 29th in Randall Library’s gallery. Our interpretive plans have been turned in and sent to ourContinue reading “Interpretive Plans, Home Tours, Newsletters, and Social Justice”