Women & Family Ties in Immigration: Anna, Julian, & Paranka Debaylo

For Women's History Month I am revisiting some of my favorite research projects I've undertaken and focusing on women of all walks of life, not just "great" or notable women --though I love that many are highlighting the wonderful, trailblazing, inspiring women of the past this month.  Introduction Today's post is about Anna, Julian and…

#WomensHistoryMonth: Marie Curie — Guest Post by a Budding Historian

In Women's History Month, I am writing about women from the past including inspiring women, controversial women, unheard of women, and everyday women. I am also taking the opportunity to support and lift up today and tomorrow's women. The following post was written by my 10-year-old niece, Tori, for her 4th grade class project about…

La Malinche: Traitor, Victim & Survivor, or Mother of Mestizos?

La Malinche, whose given name was most likely Malinalli, was an indigenous woman in what is now Mexico in the early 1500s. She has also been known as Malintzin and Doña Marina (as the Spanish called her.) Most well known as the indigenous woman who helped the Spanish conquer the Aztecs by serving as translator, La…

Truth in Fiction: The Tattooist of Auschwitz & the Problem with Novels “Based on a True Story”

I recently finished the novel, The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris. It was a Christmas gift from my wonderful sister-in-law who knows I love history. She actually tricked me into telling her I wanted it. I had seen the book on lists of books for history lovers, best seller sections of stores, and online…

#MusicMonday: The Campaign for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday in 3 Songs

Having grown up in an era when Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was already established as a national holiday, it can seem as if the holiday was a no-brainer, a day to celebrate this important man's contributions to civil rights, equality, and our nation. However, the holiday was, and still is by some, debated and…

“Born in the USA” and 4 other songs you didn’t know were about the Vietnam War

Ok, so you may know that a few of these are about the Vietnam War (1955-1975), but some are a bit more obscure or surprising. The Vietnam War is one of the least understood, most contested and divisive wars in American history. The war was so hotly opposed by the American public that returning veterans…

Día de Muertos: Nuestra Celebración

Día de Muertos or Day of the Dead is actually a 3 day celebration in honor and in memory of the deceased. Despite the association with death and skulls, the tradition is all about remembering deceased relatives and honoring their memory. It is a colorful and bright celebration of their lives. The modern holiday combines…

Public Historian on Vacation: From San Antonio to New Iberia, Louisiana & NOLA

Finally coming to the end of my Public Historian on Vacation series. I spent so much time writing about San Antonio even though we were only there for 2 days because we packed a lot into 2 days, it was our first time visiting, and it was so beautiful and interesting. After we visited the…

Public Historian on Vacation: The Missions of San Antonio

This is part four of my Public Historian on Vacation series, which was originally intended to be a three part series. However, I realized I had more to say about various stops along the way. However, this will be the third and final post about our time in San Antonio before moving on to our…

#ThrowbackThursday, #FarmingFriday & Social Media Consulting

I currently work as the archivist for a private company. In that position I get to manage a collection, do research for reference requests, manage loans, etc. However, I do not get to do research beyond the company really so I miss researching about more varied historical topics. For that reason I have begun doing…