District Sights: The National Air & Space Museum

Reflections of a Public Historian in a Science Museum My husband and I recently took a long weekend trip to Washington, D.C. to visit my brother and see the sights. We had both been twice before and seen the monuments and some of the major museums, so this time we had a pretty specific list…

‘Unconventional’ Mothers: Latina Immigrants in the Early & Late 20th Century U.S.

During women's history month, I highlighted not only trailblazing, pioneering, "noteworthy" or famous women, but also controversial, lesser-known, and everyday women. All women have been a part of history and, like men, deserve to be remembered, documented, studied, and presented in all of their complicated, multifaceted glory. Today's post explores the ultimate woman in many…

Reflections on Women’s History Month

March was Women's History Month and I was reminded of how much I love women's history. From seeing others posting about the women of the past who inspired them, honoring trailblazers, pioneers, and rebels, to doing my own posts, researching, writing about, and revisiting past work I've done on women in history, I am feeling…

Betsy Ross & the Myth of the First American Flag

Many elementary school children have heard of Betsy Ross, one of the few female figures of the Revolutionary War period of early American history that receives attention in classrooms. She is commonly known as the seamstress that created the first American flag. However, historical evidence actually does not exist to support this well-known "fact." The…

Women & Family Ties in Immigration: Anna, Julian, & Paranka Debaylo

For Women's History Month I am revisiting some of my favorite research projects I've undertaken and focusing on women of all walks of life, not just "great" or notable women --though I love that many are highlighting the wonderful, trailblazing, inspiring women of the past this month.  Introduction Today's post is about Anna, Julian and…

#WomensHistoryMonth: Marie Curie — Guest Post by a Budding Historian

In Women's History Month, I am writing about women from the past including inspiring women, controversial women, unheard of women, and everyday women. I am also taking the opportunity to support and lift up today and tomorrow's women. The following post was written by my 10-year-old niece, Tori, for her 4th grade class project about…

La Malinche: Traitor, Victim & Survivor, or Mother of Mestizos?

La Malinche, whose given name was most likely Malinalli, was an indigenous woman in what is now Mexico in the early 1500s. She has also been known as Malintzin and Doña Marina (as the Spanish called her.) Most well known as the indigenous woman who helped the Spanish conquer the Aztecs by serving as translator, La…

Public Historian on Vacation: From San Antonio to New Iberia, Louisiana & NOLA

Finally coming to the end of my Public Historian on Vacation series. I spent so much time writing about San Antonio even though we were only there for 2 days because we packed a lot into 2 days, it was our first time visiting, and it was so beautiful and interesting. After we visited the…