Women's History & Public History

In the field of public history, the interpretation of women’s history has become a hot topic with increasing attention and emphasis being placed on including women’s perspectives in museum exhibits and other public history initiatives. This post is a literature review and essay on how women’s history has historically been presented via museums and historicContinue reading “Women's History & Public History”

District Sights: The National Air & Space Museum

Reflections of a Public Historian in a Science Museum My husband and I recently took a long weekend trip to Washington, D.C. to visit my brother and see the sights. We had both been twice before and seen the monuments and some of the major museums, so this time we had a pretty specific listContinue reading “District Sights: The National Air & Space Museum”

History in Song: The 1992 Los Angeles Riots

On this day in 1992 the Los Angeles riots broke out in response to two specific incidents in the city and general mounting racial tensions. Just over a year prior an African American man, Rodney King, was beaten and tasered by police during a traffic stop/chase resulting in the officers involved being charged with excessiveContinue reading “History in Song: The 1992 Los Angeles Riots”

‘Unconventional’ Mothers: Latina Immigrants in the Early & Late 20th Century U.S.

During women’s history month, I highlighted not only trailblazing, pioneering, “noteworthy” or famous women, but also controversial, lesser-known, and everyday women. All women have been a part of history and, like men, deserve to be remembered, documented, studied, and presented in all of their complicated, multifaceted glory. Today’s post explores the ultimate woman in manyContinue reading “‘Unconventional’ Mothers: Latina Immigrants in the Early & Late 20th Century U.S.”

Betsy Ross & the Myth of the First American Flag

Many elementary school children have heard of Betsy Ross, one of the few female figures of the Revolutionary War period of early American history that receives attention in classrooms. She is commonly known as the seamstress that created the first American flag. However, historical evidence actually does not exist to support this well-known “fact.” TheContinue reading “Betsy Ross & the Myth of the First American Flag”

Women & Family Ties in Immigration: Anna, Julian, & Paranka Debaylo

For Women’s History Month I am revisiting some of my favorite research projects I’ve undertaken and focusing on women of all walks of life, not just “great” or notable women –though I love that many are highlighting the wonderful, trailblazing, inspiring women of the past this month.  Introduction Today’s post is about Anna, Julian andContinue reading “Women & Family Ties in Immigration: Anna, Julian, & Paranka Debaylo”

Public Historian on Vacation: From San Antonio to New Iberia, Louisiana & NOLA

Finally coming to the end of my Public Historian on Vacation series. I spent so much time writing about San Antonio even though we were only there for 2 days because we packed a lot into 2 days, it was our first time visiting, and it was so beautiful and interesting. After we visited theContinue reading “Public Historian on Vacation: From San Antonio to New Iberia, Louisiana & NOLA”

#ThrowbackThursday, #FarmingFriday & Social Media Consulting

I currently work as the archivist for a private company. In that position I get to manage a collection, do research for reference requests, manage loans, etc. However, I do not get to do research beyond the company really so I miss researching about more varied historical topics. For that reason I have begun doingContinue reading “#ThrowbackThursday, #FarmingFriday & Social Media Consulting”

Public Historian on Vacation: San Antonio Beyond the Alamo

Our first day in San Antonio included barbecue and a tour of the Alamo, but also a trip to a less traditional kind of museum, Barney Smith’s Toilet Seat Art Museum. Yes, toilet seat art. Barney Smith, a former plumber and volunteer firefighter turned artist has collected and decorated hundreds, maybe thousands, of toilet seats.Continue reading “Public Historian on Vacation: San Antonio Beyond the Alamo”

Public Historian on Vacation: San Antonio & The Alamo

After leaving Galveston, we drove to San Antonio to meet up with my other set of grandparents (my mother’s mother and husband). We arrived, ate barbecue on the River Walk (because when in Texas…) and then set off to see the Alamo (because again, when in Texas.) My mother, having grown up in Texas, hadContinue reading “Public Historian on Vacation: San Antonio & The Alamo”